Mobile devices and digital awareness at Bedales

By Louise Wilson, Senior Deputy

Mobile phones can be a useful adjunct to, or even an essential part of, students’ daily life. They can also be a curse.

In assembly last week, a panel of teachers and students shared their views. A teacher celebrated their pleasure in using a journal and questioned whether mobile phones limit our ability to reflect. One colleague was unnerved by the multiplicity and falsity of our online identities, especially given that the top three apps used by students in the previous seven days were social media. A student countered that their real life persona also involved presenting different images. One student marvelled at the virtual nature of phone life which also enables them to connect and brings opportunities such as work experience. It was noted that some students (and adults?) overuse their phones and one said that they wanted to be more conscious of their own usage, whilst also finding it helpful to keep notes and reminders and to contact home easily.

Students don’t necessarily view devices as anti-social; what is the problem with a group of friends using devices in a variety of ways, whilst sharing each other’s company? There is a general feeling that navigating Block 3 and early adolescence through the issues presented by devices can be difficult; those who find social situations challenging, find a mobile a useful crutch and for those prone to distraction, a phone is an ideal tool for avoiding work.

To ban or not to ban? The overwhelming view of staff and students is not to ban, but we do have controls in place and could increase those. Mobiles have to be handed in at night in the first term of Block 3, phones may not be used in lessons without staff permission (but is the phone’s presence in a pocket a distraction?) and social media is not available on the school network during the school day – apart from Instagram, which the School Council have suggested should not be available to Block 3s in future. Of course, with 4G they could still get it across much of the school site. Should we remove it on principle or rely on students learning from each other and staff and parents about appropriate use?

Watch the video above, or on Youtube here, which is a collaboration between HMC and Digital Awareness UK and shows how technology can take over family, school and personal life – including sleep – or alternatively controlled, to give technology a positive role.

Education is key. Block 3 parents will receive a useful guide to internet safety in the post next week. The NSPCC have launched a new website and app to help parents understand the sites and apps their children are using and help keep them safe whilst using the internet. It is updated monthly and enables you to enter the name of an app or site to find out more. For example, here is the information about Instagram. Schools have been warned about the current trend called ‘Blue Whale’ which encourages participants to take challenges, the last one of which is to take one’s life.  If your child is watching the web series 13 Reasons Why on Netflix you may wish to read the reviews on the series, some of which suggest it encourages young people to consider suicide. ‘Yellow’ is a teenage version of Tinder and the NSPCC have expressed concern about its use by paedophiles.

Friends of Bedales (FOBs) gathered on Saturday to talk about mobiles with Jenni Brittain, Head of Boarding and 6.2 Housemistress. Parents want students to be fully involved with school-based decisions about mobiles, for this reason, a ban is not on the cards – and they wondered if students might explore mobile phone use creatively, by means of drama.

If your family would like to see how much time you have each spent on the different apps on your iphone in the last seven days, go to  ‘settings’ and ‘battery’ – many of us did this at school with fascinating findings and a resulting desire from some to modify our usage. The discussion continues in fine Bedalian tradition and any changes will be communicated this term.

Thank you to all those parents who have shared your views.

Spring in Outdoor Work

Here in Outdoor Work we’re smack bang in the middle of one of the most exciting times of year.

Lambing began last week, all safely delivered and thriving, all of them preposterously cute. There are now only three ewes left to lamb. And these are not our only new arrivals. Thanks to the BPA’s generous gift of an incubator, our chicks are now nearly a month old. They are all doing well, in fact they seem to be growing by the minute and we can’t wait to get them outside. See photos below.

Angelica with pigletsHowever, spring also brings some sad news from the sty: Angelica sadly passed away last week, not long after her piglets got their first taste of freedom in the woods (pictured right). Watching them race each other around the enclosure was lovely; they looked so excited and inquisitive, Angelica will be sadly missed.

Keep up-to-date around the farm with @BedalesOutdoorW on Twitter.

 

 

By Andrew Martin, Head of Outdoor Work

Successful bids to enhance school life

Each year the Bedales Parents’ Association Committee meets to consider funding bids from students and staff at all three schools for equipment and projects that would enhance and extend life experiences at the school. This year, after a lively discussion of the merits of each bid, the Committee made awards of some £16,800, covering 17 different projects. The projects the BPA agreed to back cover a wide range of activities and equipment, including outdoor projects, purchases of computer, photographic, scientific and sports equipment, a drum kit, an astronomical telescope and dome for the new Observatory and, perhaps most unusual of all, the purchase of a radio controlled working drone aircraft for use across seven departments, including Science, Geography, Computing, Outdoor Work and PRE.

By Neil Blackley and Richard Miller, BPA Committee

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Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.