Bedalians head to Oxford

By Clare Jarmy, Head of Religious Studies and Philosophy and Head of Academic Enrichment and Oxbridge, Bedales

Every year, 6.1 students at Bedales have the opportunity to attend the Oxford University Open Day. This gives them the chance to attend lectures, see some of the colleges, and get a feel for what an Oxford education, and the application process, would be like. This year, as part of the 3i programme, students in Block 3 and 4 were invited to hop on the bus for a trip that we ran in parallel: an Oxford experience that introduced them to a top university, and to find out the differences that Oxford and Cambridge present, compared with other universities. For the youngest students, it was a chance to iron out some misconceptions ‘If I’m at this college, am I still at Oxford?’ or ‘Which college does English?’ For some, it was a chance to start setting their sights high for study after Bedales.

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Whilst the 6.1s were traipsing from college to college in the afternoon, Block 3 and 4 got a chance to see some of Oxford’s excellent museums, including the Museum of the History of Science, and the Natural History Museum (including the shrunken heads in the Pitt Rivers). The Block 3s had a photo competition, with categories such as ‘most intriguing object’ which you can see above.

This is just one of the many opportunities that students in 3i get. 3i (after Badley’s happy phrase ‘intelligence, initiative and individuality’) is a community of engaged, interested learners at Bedales. It includes academic scholars, those nominated by staff, and those who nominate themselves. 3i runs a regular bulletin, which publicises events, competitions and trips.

New University Options With UK Liberal Arts Degrees

An important aspect of the work of the Bedales Professional Guidance Department, which I lead, is to be alert to changes and trends within higher education. For example, there has been a trend in recent years for university applicants to be admitted on lower grades than those expressed in offers which, in turn, has seen us advise students on their applications and make them aware of incentives from some universities to those applicants making them their first choice. This is part of our extensive engagement with students over the choices they make concerning their working lives beyond the school, wherever their preferences may lie.

An interesting new development has been the rising enthusiasm in UK universities for more American-style liberal arts degrees which, initially at least, see students pursue a wider range of studies than tends to be the case here.

This comes against a backdrop of increasing interest amongst Bedales students in studying in the US and Canada. They appear to value the additional flexibility that this offers them, and the fees, whilst typically expensive, have not appeared quite so steep subsequent to the increases to those in the UK. European universities are also opening up to English students, who can expect liberal arts programmes to be taught in English, and are extremely well supported by their institutions.

However, over the past few years a number of UK universities have launched modular liberal arts degrees, all of which offer students the opportunity to study a combination of major and minor subjects rather than straight single honours programmes. The most recent of these, offering extensive subject choices and significant flexibility, is from Leicester University. After the first year students can upgrade their minor interest to joint honours, or can even change to single honours should they so wish. It is the most flexible of the liberal arts degrees I’ve seen here, and I think many Bedales students – although not all – will find it attractive.

When I interview Bedales students during the 6:I year as they begin to consider their UCAS applications, some are very sure about what they want to do. Many don’t know, however, and so find it very hard to choose – a significant factor in some electing to study abroad.

Now, it seems, they may be able to find such a programme without leaving these shores. As with everything, there are potential drawbacks as well as advantages to this route. They are not for everybody, and those who are clear about their direction are likely to be better served by the single honours route. We are mindful that some of our students have not enjoyed the American model but, instead, have been frustrated to find themselves unable to study some subjects in as much detail as they would like.

For such courses to work well they require sound planning and management – some Bedales students who have gone on to pursue joint honours programmes have found the workload onerous, exacerbated by poor sequencing of requirements for written work. I suspect that students’ perception of such programmes as manageable will be the making or breaking of them in the long run.

Certainly, I will be alerting many of our students to what Leicester and others offering liberal arts degrees have to offer, and I’d like to see more universities follow this trend and make the programmes work. Industry has been vocal in its requirement for entrants with a rounded education, and there is an increasing numbers of students seeking an education hitherto available only overseas – such programmes can serve both parties well.  Of course, this does not undermine the importance of the more traditional degree programme, which remains the better bet for those wanting to specialise, or to pursue higher academic study, and we will encourage our students to think very carefully about what is right for them.

By Vikki Alderson-Smart, Higher Education Advisor

 

 

Research into European universities proving promising

A recent research visit to universities in Europe revealed some very favourable options for ambitious students. A selection of prestigious universities is increasingly offering courses taught entirely in English. This not only allows British students the possibility of either spending a year abroad through the Erasmus scheme but perhaps the opportunity to complete a full Honours degree in Europe whilst also experiencing esteemed vocational links, well equipped facilities, working within another culture and much reduced or even free tuition fees compared to studying in the UK. For our students with the aspiration for an alternative, more cosmopolitan education, Europe may hold the key. Read more.

By Sarah Oakley, University Liaison Co-ordinator

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Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.

Research into European Universities proving promising

A recent research visit to universities in Holland, Belgium, Germany, Denmark and Sweden revealed some very favourable options for ambitious students. Though many undergraduate degrees are taught in the national language, a selection of prestigious universities are increasingly offering courses taught entirely in English. This not only allows British students the possibility of either spending a year abroad through the Erasmus scheme or perhaps, more excitingly, the opportunity to complete a full Honours degree in Europe whilst also experiencing  prestigious vocational links, well equipped facilities, working in another culture and much reduced or even free tuition fees compared to studying in the UK. Our observations also suggest advantages to students in teaching with favourable staff-student ratios and developing an international perspective and a CV that will stand out from others.  For those students with the aspiration for an alternative, more cosmopolitan education, Europe may hold the key. Our 6.1 students will have the opportunity to fully explore their options at the UCAS Day and ‘Beyond Bedales: Higher Education and Careers Fair’ taking place on 14 and 15 June 2013.

By Sarah Oakley, University Liaison Co-ordinator, Bedales School

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Bedales School is one of the UK’s top independent private co-education boarding schools. Bedales comprises three schools situated in Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire: Dunannie (ages 3–8), Dunhurst (ages 8–13) and Bedales itself (ages 13–18). Established in 1893 Bedales School puts emphasis on the Arts, Sciences, voluntary service, pastoral care, and listening to students’ views. Bedales is acclaimed for its drama, theatre, art and music. The Headmaster is Keith Budge.